5 Photo Masking Resources

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5 Photo Masking Resources
by Jen White

Do you generally think outside the box?

If you need a photo mask, where do you turn to first?

Where do you turn to second? Do you have a third, fourth, and fifth resource?

It’s easy to get stuck inside a tiny little thinking box — which ultimately limits your ability to utilize the resources available to you.

Here’s my go-to list for photo masks. Maybe it will help you broaden your masking reach. Or, maybe you’ll be able to add to my list…I’d LOVE that!

  • ONE. Photo masks in kits. These were designed to make your photos sing and rarely require adjustments.
  • TWO. Paint and watercolors in kits–often called overlays. These elements were designed to add soft color to a scrapbook page. But, consider clipping a photo to them.
  • THREE. Brushes in PS/PSE. Brushes are always grayscale and can have varying degrees of transparency. Try clicking just once to see how a brush looks as a stamp, or click and drag to give a brushed look. It’s often hard to tell how brushes will react with your photo until you actually do the clipping. Also try searching for free brushes on the web.
  • FOUR. Shapes in PS/PSE. Photoshop Elements has many great shapes for photo masks. Adobe Photoshop has as few, too. Just as with brushes, you can find many more shapes on the web.
  • FIVE. Elements in kits. Look for ones that have interesting edges. Not all elements will make good photo masks, you’ll just have to give it a try.

For a little bit of fun playing with masks and photos, check out my tutorial — Grouped Photo Masking.

 

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jenwhite-48x48Author: Jen White | Contact Us
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One Response

  1. Terri
    | Reply

    What great idea Jen! Thanks for the reminder.

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